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Excavations
at
Valshni
Village,
Arizona

Cover
Copyright

2002 Editor's Foreword

1973 Editor's Foreword

Author's Preface

Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

Regional & vicinity maps

Introduction

Habitat

Methods

Dating

Architecture
Vamori
Topawa
Non-architectural Features
Pottery
Local
Intrusive
Misc. Clay Objects
Burial

Stonework

Bonework

Shellwork

Summary and Conclusions

Appendix: Canal

Bibliography

2000 notes

Valshni Village logo


Methods

The surface indications of the site consisted entirely of five trash mounds and several areas of sherd concentrations (Fig. 4). Prior to the beginning of excavations, the trash mounds and the major sherd concentrations were enclosed within a grid measuring 300 meters overall on a side. This was divided into squares 30 meters on a side. The north-south grid lines were given letter designations while the east-west lines were labeled with numbers, allowing each block in the grid to be named by the combination of coordinates occurring in the northwest corner.


Fig 4. Site map
Figure 4. Map of Valshni Village
Higher resolution image (1912 x 2172 pixels, 51 KB).

The lack of surface evidence meant that general systematized trenching had to be done throughout the area of probable occupation. Six trenches were dug in each of the 30 meter blocks thought to be worth testing. These trenches were 1 meter wide and excavated into sterile soil on a north-south axis. The trenches in each block were numbered from I-VI and given the grid block label in which they were dug; thus, Block D:7 Trench III. The artifacts from each trench were analyzed separately in order that differences in the various sections of the site could be detected.

The process of trenching led to the discovery of many features not visible on the surface. When necessary, the trenches were widened in order to expose the features more completely for observation, mapping-,, and photography. Structures, as they were detected were excavated by digging a trench around the limits of the floor area. The central fill above the floor was then removed to within 10 centimeters of the floor. The artifacts in the last 10 centimeters above the floor were assumed to belong to the period of occupation of the structure. Detailed floor plans and cross sections were made of all structures which showed anything at all of their original form. Cooking pits were exposed and left in place to show their original depth and shape.

Stratigraphic studies were carried out extensively. The study of surface collections indicating that the occupation of Valshni Village covered a long period of time, while the knowledge that dendrochronology dates would not be available, made these studies mandatory. Only one structure was found superimposed upon another. This made it necessary to do the studies using trash deposits, which were available in two forms; sheet rubbish and mounded rubbish. No rubbish pits were found. The sheet rubbish was found across the entire site, however, it was too thin and mixed to be of much aid. The mounds provided the best prospects for obtaining the desired stratigraphy.

The four main mounds averaged 22 meters in diameter and 1.5 meters in height. The surrounding land was almost flat, so they had not been complicated by wash from upslope. All of the mounds had been heavily burrowed by rodents.

The four larger mounds were tested by using an arbitrary testing procedure. Each of these mounds was tested across its diameter by removing blocks that were one meter long, one-half meter wide, and twenty-five or fifty centimeters thick. The thickness was determined by the size of the mound. The smaller fifth mound was sampled by a broad trench cut through its center.

The mound fill in each stratigraphic block was screened through one-half inch wire mesh. The pottery from each block was then bagged separately from other blocks, and eventually washed and sorted.




. Habitat
Top of page



Table of Contents
Dating .


Table of Contents
(Sequencing left to right, top to bottom)

Cover

Copyright

2002 Editor's Foreword

1973 Editor's Foreword

Author's Preface

Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

Regional & vicinity maps

Introduction

Habitat

Methods

Dating

Architecture

Vamori Architecture

Topawa Architecture

Non-architectural Features

Pottery

Local pottery

Intrusive pottery

Misc. Clay Objects

Burial

Stonework

Bonework

Shellwork

Summary and Conclusions

Appendix: Canal

Bibliography

2000 notes



Walter 'Dutch' Duering
PO Box 8429
Phoenix, AZ 85066-8429
United States

duering@stockmorehouse.com