The
Classic
Period
Hohokam


With Reference
to the Sinagua,
Salado, and
Prescott Branches


Table of
Contents

Title page

Table of Contents

Illustrations

1999 Foreword

Introduction

The Salado Theory

The Salado Branch

The Prescott Branch

The Sinagua Branch

Comparison: Prescott, Salado and Sinagua

The Hohokam

Summary

Appendix A:
A Probable Prescott Branch Site on the Lower Agua Fria River


Appendix B:
Some Problems Presented In This Paper


Bibliography A

Bibliography B

1999 Annotations

1999 Bibliography



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The Classic Period Hohokam, With References to the Sinagua, Salado and Prescott Branches, 1969

Listed in descending order of usefulness, these three pages I believe are the best pages
of the paper:

The Classic Period Hohokam, for 1969 probably the most thought provoking pages in the report.

Appendix A, the Calderwood Site on the lower Agua Fria River. Prior to the publication of this page, there had been no published descriptions.

The Sinagua, little original thought, good quotes from Harold S. Colton's The Sinagua


Introduction

The past year witnessed the excavation of two Classic Period Hohokam sites in the Salt River Valley. This writer had the great fortune of being associated with both projects. The first was a small site located in Mesa, Arizona. This site was excavated by the Spring dig class from the Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University. The second was a highway salvage job on a large site excavated under contract by the Arizona State Museum. Being as this writer worked on both sites, he had the opportunity to learn a great deal concerning the Classic period Hohokam.

As a result of this newly acquired knowledge, the writer began to have ideas about the Classic period Hohokam, ideas which did not equate with ideas which have more or less been generally accepted since the mid-1930's.

The paper was originally conceived of as simply a means of expressing views concerning the Classic period Hohokam, particularly in the matter of the Salado invasion idea. I did not support this theory and therefore had to support my argument. However, as library research started to add up, it became apparent that a person could not simply discuss the Classic period Hohokam in terms of Hohokam; it had to be in terms of the Greater Southwest. The Classic period Hohokam sees to be more affected by outside influences than any other part of Hohokam history, with the possible exception of the early Pioneer period. This study should include Northern Mexico, the Salado, Sinagua, and Prescott Branches. Ultimately it is my feeling that this will be expanded to include the various Anasazi and Mogollon Branches until the integrated whole is achieved.

With this new outlook on the Classic period Hohokam, came a vast amount of research. Time simply has not allowed but a fraction of this to be completed. The Salado, Sinagua, and Prescott Branches are discussed on later pages. I am very disappointed that it was not possible to carry on a great deal of research about Mexico as I feel that the greatest impetus to the Classic period Hohokam originated out of North Mexico. Therefore Mexico is not discussed in this paper. Another shortcoming is that only the River Hohokam are referred to here, time not allowing proper research into the other branches.

Part of the problem in researching was the unavailability of some of the references used by other writers. Some of these are Masters Theses or Doctoral Dissertations which were not immediately available. Another problem was that of volumes which had been misplaced or checked out of the library. A third problem was that some of the references were not brought to the attention of this writer until it was too late to use them.

A great deal of research, both field and library, remains to be done. The research which has been conducted to date has convinced this writer that cultural histories of considerable time depth, perhaps back into the later stages of what Cynthia Irwin-Williams (1967:441-457) calls the Picosa. It is indeed unfortunate that these culture histories are for the most part very incomplete.

Considering the incompleteness of the data presented on these pages, it has not been possible to arrive at any solid conclusions. However, the data amassed by the author does seem to indicate a pattern which is brought out in the summary.





Created:
19 September 1999

Revisions

Major:
10 October 1999

Minor:
19 January 2003







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( Sequencing: left to right; top to bottom )

Title page


Table of Contents

Illustrations

1999 Foreword

Introduction

The Salado Theory

The Salado Branch

The Prescott Branch

The Sinagua Branch

Comparison: Prescott, Salado and Sinagua

The Hohokam

Summary

Appendix A:
A Probable Prescott Branch Site on the Lower Agua Fria River

Appendix B:
Some Problems Presented In This Paper

Bibliography A

Bibliography B

1999 Annotations

1999 Bibliography




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